Vehicle Bill of Sale

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A vehicle bill of sale is a form essential to the sale of a vehicle between two parties. Most states require that a vehicle bill of sale be included in the sale of an automobile. States that require a vehicle bill of sale often provide their own form which can be found at your local DMV office. If your state does not require a vehicle bill of sale, it’s still a good idea to include the form in the sale. Create a Vehicle Bill of Sale below.

Table of Contents


    BY STATE

    What is a Vehicle Bill of Sale?

    A Vehicle Bill of Sale is a document that proves an automobile was purchased by a buyer from a seller. It also acts as a receipt for the buyer’s record and will protect the buyer in the future if a dispute of the sale arises. Your local DMV office will normally look at your vehicle bill of sale to calculate how much in sales tax you owe when registering your newly purchased vehicle. A Vehicle Bill of Sale is different than your ordinary bill of sale because the value of a vehicle largely depends if you can legally drive it on the road. If your state requires a vehicle bill of sale and you forget to use it in the sale of a vehicle, you could have a serious problem getting the vehicle titled and registered in your name.

    Other names for a Vehicle Bill of Sale:

    • Auto Bill of Sale, Car Bill of Sale, DMV Bill of Sale

    How to Sell or Purchase a Motor Vehicle (Private Party)

    There is a certain protocol that must be followed when selling or buying a vehicle during a private sale. A key component of that is the execution of a motor vehicle bill of sale. Below are a series of steps designed to guide you through the process.

    Step 1 – Establish the Terms of Agreement

    Assuming the buyer and seller have come in contact with one another either through an ad or by word of mouth, both parties must discuss the terms and conditions of how the transaction will transpire. Specifics such as the price of the vehicle, method of payment, and what extras are included (if any) should all be negotiated prior to the signing.

    Step 2 – Acquiring the VIN (Vehicle Identification Number)

    Every vehicle contains a unique 17-digit code called a “Vehicle Identification Number”. It is typically found on the driver’s side dash but can be located in other areas of the vehicle as well. The buyer should ask the seller to provide the VIN in order to check the vehicle’s history. There are several sites where you can supply the VIN and receive a full vehicle history report. Some of the more popular sites include:

    • CarFax.com – View the full vehicle history report for a fee of $39.99 (other deals are offered based on the number of reports you desire).
    • AutoCheck.com – Purchase a single report for $24.99.
    • VINCheckPro.com – One premium vehicle history report priced at $6.95 (less extensive report than previously mentioned sites).

    A vehicle history report will only include information that was recorded by insurance companies, DMV’s, police departments, and mechanics. If an incident was not brought to the attention of one of the aforementioned, it will not appear on the report. To ensure that there are no hidden defects within the vehicle, a pre-purchase inspection by a mechanic of the buyer’s choice can be considered a good measure before completing the transaction.

    Step 3 – Collecting Vehicle Documentation

    It is important that the seller collects all the vital paperwork regarding the vehicle in order to give it to the new owner. Such paperwork includes:

    Certificate of Title – This is considered the most important document when it comes to the transfer of ownership. It contains specific information pertaining to the vehicle and allows the seller to sign over their rights of possession.

    Vehicle Registration – To operate a vehicle on public roadways, it is essential that you register the vehicle with the state in which you reside. When you do so, you are given a piece of paper proving that the vehicle is registered. You must provide the buyer with the registration upon transfer of ownership.

    Bill of Sale – Once the buyer and seller have agreed upon the terms of the transaction, it is highly recommended to carry out a bill of sale. This form records specific sale information and typically requires that both parties sign and date the document. It may not be required in every state but is still considered commonplace as it works as a receipt of the transaction.

    Odometer Disclosure Statement – Whenever there is a transfer of ownership in regards to a motor vehicle, it is legally required for the seller to disclose the odometer reading of the vehicle. In some states, you can record this information to the title or within the bill of sale, in others, you are responsible to complete and sign an Odometer Disclosure Statement. This form will inquire certain details concerning the mileage and mandates that both parties sign the document.

    Proof of Identity – When purchasing a used vehicle in private sale, it is important for the buyer to request a valid form of ID from the seller to guarantee that they are indeed the rightful owner. A driver’s license, state issued ID, or passport should be sufficient evidence to dispell any suspicion of fraudulent activity. (Be sure to match the name listed on the ID to the name recorded on the title/registration.)

    Step 4 – Finalizing the Transaction

    Now that both parties have come to an agreement and are satisfied with the preliminary measures, it is time to execute the transaction. The seller and buyer should meet at an agreed upon location and do the following actions:

    • Sign the Necessary Paperwork – The seller must provide the signed-over title and a completed bill of sale. The bill of sale will then be signed by both individuals and a copy may be distributed to each party.
    • Collect Payment – The buyer must provide the form of payment that was agreed upon prior to the closing. Once the seller receives the payment, the transaction is complete. (Sales tax must be paid to the DMV during the transfer of title and registration.)

    Step 5 – Registering your Recently Purchased Vehicle

    The new owner must now bring the vehicle in for registration. You are typically allotted a certain period of time from the date of sale to register your vehicle. Visit your local DMV and be prepared with the following documentation (requisites vary from state to state):

    • Bill of Sale – Completed and signed by both the seller and buyer.
    • Certificate of Title – The original title signed by the previous owner.
    • Proof of Auto Insurance – Individual registering must furnish evidence of an active car insurance policy in his or her name.
    • Photo ID – Be prepared to present a valid form of photo identification (driver’s license, state ID, passport, etc.)
    • Odometer Disclosure Statement – Required in certain states, otherwise record the mileage on title or bill of sale.
    • Emissions Test – Only if it legally required within the state you live.
    • Payment – Bring the necessary funds to appease any fees associated with registration, titling, and/or taxes.

    DMV Locations by State

    State DMV Office Locations & Hours Is a Bill of Sale Legally Required? Motor Vehicle Bill of Sale Download
    Alabama Vehicle Registration Offices Yes, if there is no title available. Adobe PDF
    Alaska DMV (Division of Motor Vehicles) Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Arizona MVD (Motor Vehicle Services) Locations No Adobe PDF
     Arkansas OMV (Office of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, if the seller would like to apply for a sales tax credit or if there is no space for the seller to provide a signature on the title. Adobe PDF
     California DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations No Adobe PDF
     Colorado DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, if the buyer would like to operate the vehicle prior to registration or if there is no room to record the mileage on the title. Adobe PDF
     Connecticut DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Delaware DMV (Division of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, under certain circumstances a bill of sale may be required. Adobe PDF
     Florida DHSMV (Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Georgia County Tag Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Hawaii Hawaii Department of Transportation Locations Yes, if the individual selling the vehicle is not listed on the title. Adobe PDF
     Idaho DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, if there is no room to input the sales price on the title. Adobe PDF
     Illinois SOS (Secretary of State) Facility Locations No Adobe PDF
     Indiana BMV (Bureau of Motor Vehicles) Office Locations Yes, if the title is unobtainable, a bill of sale must be completed, signed by both parties, and notarized. Adobe PDF
     Iowa County Treasurers Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Kansas DOV (Division of Vehicles) Locations Yes, if there is no available space on the title to input the names and signatures of the parties involved or the purchase price. Adobe PDF
     Kentucky County Clerks Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Louisiana OMV (Office of Motor Vehicles) Yes, if the title does not contain pertinent info such as the sales date/price or signatures of the parties involved. Adobe PDF
     Maine BMV (Bureau of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Maryland MVA (Motor Vehicle Administration) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Massachusetts RMV (Registry of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, if there is no title available or if the vehicle is exempt from titling, a bill of sale and the last registration will suffice. Adobe PDF
     Michigan SOS (Secretary of State) Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Minnesota DVS (Driver and Vehicle Services) Locations No Adobe PDF
     Mississippi Tax Collectors Office Locations Yes, if there is no available space to insert the sales price on the title. Adobe PDF
     Missouri DOR (Department of Revenue) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Montana County Treasurer’s Office Locations Yes, only in the absence of a title, in which case, you would have to provide a bill of sale as well as an Application for Replacement Certificate of Title (Form MV7). Adobe PDF
     Nebraska County Treasurer’s Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Nevada Nevada DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, a bill of sale is necessary if there is no title and the vehicle is at least 9 years old with no active liens. Adobe PDF
     New Hampshire DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations No Adobe PDF
     New Jersey MVC (Motor Vehicle Commission) Locations Yes, if the title is missing. Adobe PDF
     New Mexico MVD (Motor Vehicle Division) Locations Yes, when the certificate of title is unavailable. Adobe PDF
     New York DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     North Carolina

    County Tax Office Locations

    No, only required when purchased from a dealership. Adobe PDF
     North Dakota DOT (Department of Transportation) Locations No Adobe PDF
     Ohio BMV (Bureau of Motor Vehicles) Locations No, only if the vehicle was acquired in another state or if it was imported from another country. Adobe PDF
     Oklahoma Tax Commission Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Oregon DOT (Department of Transportation) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Pennsylvania DOT (Department of Transportation) Locations No Adobe PDF
     Rhode Island DMV (Division of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     South Carolina DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, if there is no area to note the sales price or mileage on the title, or if the vehicle was titled prior to 06/19/1989. Adobe PDF
     South Dakota County Treasurer’s Office Locations No, only if the vehicle was purchased in a different state. Adobe PDF
     Tennessee County Clerk’s Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Texas County Tax Office Locations No Adobe PDF
     Utah DMV (Division of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Vermont DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     Virginia DMV (Department of Motor Vehicles) Locations No Adobe PDF
     Washington DOL (Department of Licensing) Locations Yes Adobe PDF
     West Virginia DMV (Division of Motor Vehicles) Locations Yes, if the vehicle was purchased for 50% less than its “NADA Clean Loan Book” value, otherwise, it will be taxed according to its full value. Adobe PDF
     Wisconsin DOT (Department of Transportation) Locations No Adobe PDF
     Wyoming County Treasurer’s Office Locations Yes Adobe PDF

    Defining the Terminology

    When creating a bill of sale document, you must know the terminology attributed to the agreement. Listed below are the common words/phrases associated with the bill of sale form:

    • Seller (Vendor) – Person(s) releasing their rights and transferring ownership of the property to the buyer.
    • Buyer (Purchaser) – Individual(s) who are buying the property and obtaining the title from the seller.
    • VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) – Is a sequence of 17 numbers and letters that can identify a specific vehicle. Every vehicle contains its own unique VIN that can determine the automobile’s characteristics, manufacturer, history, and other specific details. (The location of the VIN varies depending on the vehicle.)
    • As Is – This term indicates the vehicle is being purchased in its present condition and the buyer accepts any defects the property may have. By incorporating this into the bill of sale, the seller protects themselves from any claims of not disclosing pertinent information involving damages to the property.
    • Gift – If the property is being transferred free of charge, it is being gifted.
    • Sum of (In the consideration of) – This phrase indicates what price the property is being sold for.
    • Notary Public – Is a public official who is authorized to review and certify specific legal documents.
    • Trade-in – is a practice involving the exchange of property towards another piece of property. This can be an equal exchange or partially go towards the price of the desired property. (Typically executed in the automobile industry.)

    Vehicle Bill of Sale Example

    Vehicle-Bill-of-Sale-Form